The hidden health benefits of shared workspaces
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The hidden health benefits of shared workspaces

Workplace
Author since:
December, 2016
33 blog posts

Last week was Mental Health Week and it got us talking with our members about if they thought they felt healthier since they started working in a shared workspace than they did working from home.

We had already read statistics that said 60% of people working in shared spaces felt more relaxed at home since starting to co-work and 70% reported they felt healthier working in shared space. We wanted to know if this was true for our members.

The resounding answer was yes – in many many ways. From simply getting some exercise, by commuting on the tram to work, to the social aspects of how interacting with another person and being able to look them in the eyes rather than talk just on the phone made them feel healthier and more positive. One of our members, Lysha Holmes of Qui Recruitment often shares gorgeous pictures from her commute that makes her happy and demonstrates how great commuting can be!

The benefits of networking

Professor Cary Cooper, the renowned workplace psychologist, talks in many of his papers, blogs, and social media posts about the benefits of face to face and how we are social animals that require human interaction.

“Quite remarkably, the degree of mortality risk associated with lack of social relationships is similar to that which exists for more widely publicised risk factors, such as smoking.”

This is proven by the response many of our members had to how this alone had improved their wellbeing. Although prior to joining a shared workspace, many of our members didn’t know each other, they now look forward to coming in and seeing their “colleagues” and this has a positive effect on mental attitude.

Embracing healthy working

At Workplace, we offer free fruit and have also integrated yoga and a running group into our membership to encourage healthy working. Another member, Lisa Welch from Precise Search has started a lunch-time walking group where members can hop in and out and take a walk together around the city, get some air and exercise and have a chat before returning to work.

“Sitting at your desk all day and working can make you quite lethargic so we decided to get to know the city a little bit better, by taking different walks each day while also getting some exercise and air and having a chat with other members in our lunch break. It is a great way to set ourselves up for a productive afternoon’s work and we are having fun in the process, especially when we came across a very angry goose and her goslings but that is another story!”
Lisa Welch

So, the essential point is, don’t go it alone, join a community or a shared workspace. you will not only improve your productivity but your well-being in the process. But don’t just take it from us, talk to any of our members and they will tell you the same, they feel happier now they are working in a community rather than in isolation.

Up Next

Guest blog: Taking 'English' to the Chinese

Workplace
Author since:
December, 2016
33 blog posts

We have many and varied businesses working from Workplace and one that really interests us is KKANDOO who place English Teachers in China. Talking to Arthur about what he does and what life’s like when English teachers gets to China is always such an enlightening conversation, we wanted to share this with you.

Travel abroad is a unique and special experience. Truly living that experience is even more rare. There is no better way than to teach and live in Asia. As China continues to open itself to the outside world, an opportunity exists to enjoy a unique experience.

KKANDOO ENGLISH provide English Language Teachers to China commonly known as EFL (English as a Foreign Language) or ESL (English as a Second language) teachers. In addition, the opportunity to experience a totally different culture, meet new friends and make contact with the people.

More than 70 percent of Chinese parents want their children to learn English just for entering better schools, according to a recent survey report on English education in China. The online survey was conducted by the 21st Century Education Research Institute in Beijing. Parents who can afford to, are sending their children — some as young as 2 — to private language schools that are popping up all over the country. By the time they are 10, the children will be fluent.

Where do people teach?

Many of the schools are in the big cities – Beijing, Guangzhou, Shanghai, Shenzhen. But also many in the “tier 2 cities”, laughingly called the smaller cities e.g. Xi’an (pop. 9million) and Tianjin (pop. 14 million)! Whilst Beijing has become one of the world’s great capitals, it is not everyone’s cup of tea. One of my favourites away from the “big cities” is Xi’an (home of the famous Terracotta Army).

Finding partners who run schools in China or Agents who represent schools is a key part of the recruitment process. With such a large market there are some unscrupulous people out there! But there are also many great schools there too. The drive to learn English is not confined to children though. Many Language schools teach English to adults and company employees often on a one to one basis.

What sort of people go there?

Well the basics first – over 21, a degree in any discipline, a minimum of a 120 hour TEFL (Teaching English as a Foreign Language) qualification, varying experience depending on the job, a criminal background check, able to commit for 12 months. More important, flexibility, energy, patience, ability to “roll with the punches” and sociable. In return you get a decent package of pay and free accommodation – and you get the experience of a life time. You will also have fellow westerners as your co-teachers. Your best friend may be from England, Canada, US, South Africa, New Zealand or Australia or Europe. It’s all part of the experience. But it’s different.

My one piece of advice to people going

Don’t come with your Western head on! Embrace the culture and you will be fine.

And China? That needs a whole article of its own.

Art Ward

You can find out more about becoming a teacher in China through the KKANDOO ENGLISH website or by contacting Art on [email protected]

 

 

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